Indoor Air Quality

Most people are aware that outdoor air pollution can damage their health but may not know that indoor air pollution can also have significant effects. EPA studies of human exposure to air pollutants indicate that indoor air levels of many pollutants may be 2-5 times, and occasion more than 100 times, higher than outdoor levels. These levels of indoor air pollutants are of particular concern because it is estimated that most people spend as much as 90% of their time indoors.

Over the past several decades, our exposure to indoor air pollutants is believed to have increased due to a variety of factors, including the construction of more tightly sealed buildings, reduced ventilation rates to save energy, the use of synthetic building materials and furnishings, and the use of chemically formulated personal care
products, pesticides, and household cleaners.

In recent years, comparative risk studies performed by EPA and its Science Advisory Board have consistently ranked indoor air pollution among the top five environmental risks to public health. EPA, in cooperation with other Federal agencies and the
private sector, is involved in a concerted effort to better understand indoor air pollution and to reduce people's exposure to air pollutants in offices, homes, schools and other indoor environments where people live, work, and play.

For detailed information available online click here for an Introduction to Indoor Air Quality.

IAQ Publications

Radon-specific publications are also available in HTML and/or with ordering information, but are listed separately.

The following list of indoor air quality publications are available through the IAQ INFO Clearinghouse. Most of the following documents are also available in HTML.

USEPA IAQ INFO Hotline
P.O. Box 37133
Washington, DC 20013-7133

1-800-438-4318


Publication List Abstracts

The Inside Story: A Guide to Indoor Air Quality

Describes sources of air pollution in the home and office, corrective strategies, and specific measures for reducing pollutant levels. This illustrated booklet covers all major sources of pollution such as radon, household chemicals, biological contaminants, carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, pesticides, asbestos, and lead. Includes a glossary and a list of sources for additional information. Written in easy-to-understand language for the general consumer. U.S. EPA and U.S. CPSC, EPA Document #402-K-93-007, April 1995.

Should You Have the Air Ducts In Your Home Cleaned?This is a new EPA publication intended to help consumers answer this often confusing question. The guide explains what air duct cleaning is, provides guidance to help consumers decide whether to have the service performed in their home, and provides helpful information for choosing a duct cleaner, determining if duct cleaning was done properly, and how to prevent contamination of air ducts. EPA-402-K-97-002, October 1997.

An Office Building Occupant's Guide to Indoor Air QualityThis guide is intended to help people who work in office buildings learn about the roles of building managers and occupants in maintaining good indoor air quality. Office of Air and Radiation (OAR), Indoor Environments Division (6604J), EPA-402-K-97-003, October 1997

Ozone Generators That Are Sold As Air CleanersThe purpose of this document (which is only available via this web site) is to provide accurate information regarding the use of ozone-generating devices in indoor occupied spaces. This information is based on the most credible scientific evidence currently available.  Whether in its pure form or mixed with other chemicals, ozone can be harmful to health. Some studies show that ozone concentrations produced by ozone generators can exceed health standards even when one follows manufacturer’s instructions. Available scientific evidence shows that, at concentrations that do not exceed public health standards, ozone is generally ineffective in controlling indoor air pollution. The public is advised to use proven methods of controlling indoor air pollution.

Building Air Quality Action Plan The Building Air Quality Action Plan (BAQ Action Plan) meets the needs of building owners and managers who want an easy-to-understand path for taking their building from current conditions and practices to the successful institutionalization of good IAQ management practices. It emphasizes changing how you operate and maintain your building, not increasing the amount of work or cost of maintaining your building. The BAQ Action Plan follows 8 logical steps and includes a 100-item Checklist that is designed to help verify implementation of the Action Plan.

In order to use the Building Air Quality Action Plan effectively, one must have a thorough understanding of the concepts and practice of managing indoor air quality, an understanding that can be gained from a thorough reading of Building Air Quality: A Guide for Building Owners and Facility Managers (BAQ). In addition, there is extensive internal referencing of this BAQ Action Plan to the original BAQ guide, making it helpful and easy to use both documents together.

Targeting Indoor Air Pollution: EPA's Approach and Progress Summarizes the relationship between indoor air quality and health, EPA's program and approach for dealing with indoor air pollution, and authorizing legislation. This leaflet describes publications, training programs, and research activities. U.S. EPA, EPA Document Number 400-R-92-012, March 1993.

Secondhand Smoke: What You Can Do As Parents, Decisionmakers, and Building Occupants Defines secondhand smoke and describes health risks from exposure to secondhand smoke. This leaflet provides steps to take to reduce the health risks of passive smoking in the home, in the workplace, in restaurants and bars, and other indoor places. U.S. EPA, EPA Document Number 402-F-93-004, July 1993.

HUMO de segunda mano: ¿Qué puede hacer usted sobre el humo de segunda mano como padre, personal directivo y ocupante de un edificio? 402-F-93-004A

(This brochure is also available in Chinese from IAQ INFO, use the reference number EPA-402-F-93-004B

Setting the Record Straight: Secondhand Smoke is a Preventable Health Risk Provides detailed responses to the specific criticisms of EPA's assessment of lung cancer data included in the 1993 report, Respiratory Health Effects of Passive Smoking: Lung Cancer and Other Disorders (EPA/600/6-90/006 F) [This document is available from IAQ INFO]. EPA stands by its 1993 report, which found that secondhand smoke causes lung cancer in nonsmoking adults and increases the risk of bronchitis, pneumonia, and asthma in children. U.S. EPA, EPA Document Number 402-F-94-005, June 1994.

Fact Sheet: Respiratory Health Effects of Passive Smoking Describes EPA's major assessment of the respiratory health risks associated with exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), Respiratory Health Effects of Passive Smoking: Lung Cancer and Other Disorders (EPA/600/6-90/006 F). This landmark assessment concluded that widespread exposure to ETS in the U.S. presents a serious and substantial public health risk. A copy of the full report is available from EPA's Center for Environmental Research Information in Cincinnati, Ohio, or the Indoor Air Quality Information Clearinghouse (IAQ INFO). U.S. EPA, Office of Air and Radiation, EPA Document Number 43-F-93-003, January 1993.

Fact Sheet: Ventilation and Air Quality in Offices Discusses the role of mechanical heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems in maintaining indoor air quality of commercial buildings such as offices, stores, and hotels. Topics include health problems associated with poor ventilation, ways of controlling pollution, ventilation standards and building codes, and various ventilation system problems and solutions. Provides measures for resolving air quality problems and sources for additional information. U.S. EPA, EPA Document Number 402-F-94-003, Revised July 1990.

Fact Sheet: Residential Air Cleaners -  Indoor Air Facts No. 7 Discusses air cleaning as a method of reducing pollutants in indoor air. Lists types of air cleaners for the home, factors to consider in selecting an air cleaner, and sources of additional information.U.S. EPA, Office of Air and Radiation, EPA Document Number 20A-4001, February 1990.

Fact Sheet: Use and Care of Home Humidifiers - Indoor Air Facts No. 8 Explains that some types of home humidifiers can disperse microorganisms from their water tanks into the indoor air. Describes the different types of humidifiers and provides recommendations for their use and maintenance. EPA Document Number 402-F-91-101, February 1991.

Fact Sheet: Flood Cleanup: Avoiding Indoor Air Quality Problems Discusses steps to take when cleaning and repairing a home after flooding. Excess moisture in the home is cause for concern about indoor air quality primarily because it provides breeding conditions for microorganisms. This fact sheet provides tips to avoid creating indoor air quality problems during cleanup. U.S. EPA, EPA Document Number 402-F-93-005, August 1993.

Residential Air-Cleaning Devices: A Summary of Available Information Describes the general types of residential air cleaners and their effectiveness in reducing pollutants such as particles and gaseous contaminants. This detailed booklet discusses additional factors to consider when deciding whether to use an air cleaner, and provides guidelines to compare them. U.S. EPA, EPA Document Number 400-1-90-002, February 1990.

Protect Your Family and Yourself from Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Discusses health hazards associated with exposure to carbon monoxide (CO), a colorless, odorless gas which can cause headaches, dizziness, nausea, faintness, and, at high levels, death. Provides guidance on what to do if you think you are suffering from CO poisoning and what to do to prevent exposure to CO. Also included is a brief discussion about carbon monoxide detectors. U.S. EPA, Office of Air and Radiation, Indoor Environments, EPA Document Number 402-F-96-005, October 1996.

Proteja su vida y la de su familia: Evite el envenenamiento con monóxido de carbono (EPA Document Number 402-F-97-004)

The Carbon Monoxide fact sheet has also been translated into Vietnamese (EPA Document Number 402-F-96-005C), Chinese (EPA Document Number 402-F-96-005A) , and Korean (EPA Document Number 402-F-96-005B) and is available from IAQ INFO 1-800-438-4318.

What You Should Know About Combustion Appliances and Indoor Air Pollution Answers commonly-asked questions about the effect of combustion appliances (e.g., fuel-burning furnaces, space heaters, kitchen ranges, and fireplaces) on indoor air quality and human health. Describes other sources of combustion pollutants in and around the home. Suggests ways to reduce exposure to such pollutants and encourages proper installation, use, and maintenance of combustion appliances. This brochure was prepared by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, the American Lung Association, and the EPA. EPA Document Reference Number 400-F-91-100

, 1991

Asbestos in Your Home This document discusses health effects of asbestos exposure, identifies common products and building materials from the past that might contain asbestos, and describes conditions which may cause release of asbestos fibers. Describes how to identify materials that contain asbestos and how to control an asbestos problem. Explains role of asbestos professionals and use of asbestos inspectors and removal contractors. This brochure was prepared by the American Lung Association, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, and the EPA. EPA Document Reference Number 400-K-90-100, 1990

Biological Pollutants in Your Home This document explains indoor biological pollution, health effects of biological pollutants, and how to control their growth and buildup. One third to one half of all structures have damp conditions that may encourage development of pollutants such as molds and bacteria, which can cause allergic reactions--including asthma--and spread infectious diseases. Describes corrective measures for achieving moisture control and cleanliness. This brochure was prepared by the American Lung Association and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. EPA Document Reference Number 402-F-90-102, January 1990.

What You Should Know About Using Paint Strippers Paint strippers contain chemicals that loosen paint from surfaces. These chemicals can harm you if not used properly. Some paint stripping chemicals can irritate the skin and eyes, or cause headaches, drowsiness, nausea, dizziness, or loss of coordination. Some may cause cancer, reproductive problems, or damage of the liver, kidney, or brain. Others catch fire easily. Proper handling and use of paint strippers will reduce your exposure to these chemicals and lessen your health risk. This brochure was prepared with EPA and the U. S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, February 1995.

Current Federal Indoor Air Quality Activities Contains a compendium of research, policy, and program development activities concerning indoor air quality being conducted by Federal agencies. Developed under the auspices of the Interagency Committee on Indoor Air Quality (CIAQ), this booklet identifies the major indoor air quality activities, describes each activity, and provides the name of the lead agency/office and a point of contact. Contributing agencies include the EPA, the Department of Energy, the Department of Health and Human Services, and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Information is presented in tabular format and includes a list of publications available to the general public. U.S. EPA, EPA Document Number 402-K-95-005, June 1995.

Indoor Air Quality Basics for Schools Provides information on indoor air quality (IAQ) in schools to parents and others who do not normally occupy school buildings. Lists typical sources of indoor air pollutants, pollutant pathways and driving forces, health effects associated with exposures to indoor air pollutants, and basic control strategies for lowering concentrations of indoor air pollutants. Also provides advice for what to do if you think a school has an IAQ problem and information for ordering EPA's Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools Action Kit. U.S. EPA, Office of Air and Radiation, EPA Document Number 402-F-96-004, October 1996.

Technical Information

Indoor Air Pollution: An Introduction for Health Professionals Assists health professionals (especially the primary care physician) in diagnosis of patient symptoms that could be related to an indoor air pollution problem. Addresses the health problems that may be caused by contaminants encountered daily in the home and office. Organized according to pollutant or pollutant groups such as environmental tobacco smoke, VOCs, biological pollutants, and sick building syndrome, this booklet lists key signs and symptoms from exposure to these pollutants, provides a diagnostic checklist and quick reference summary, and includes suggestions for remedial action. Also includes references for information contained in each section. This booklet was developed by the American Lung Association, the American Medical Association, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, and the EPA.EPA Document Reference Number 402-R-94-007, 1994.

An Update on Formaldehyde The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission developed this brochure to provide information about formaldehyde in indoor air. The brochure tells consumers where they may come in contact with formaldehyde, how it may affect their health, and how their exposure to formaldehyde might be reduced, October 1990.

Project Summary: The Total Exposure Assessment Methodology (TEAM) Study Summarizes a study of exposure to toxic and carcinogenic chemicals (VOCs) in the air and drinking water by 600 residents of seven U.S. cities. Study concluded that indoor air in the home and at work far outweighs outdoor air as a route of exposure to toxic chemicals. Other major findings: Study demonstrated the utility of breath sampling to estimate levels of toxic chemicals in the body due to normal daily exposure; also demonstrated utility of TEAM approach for estimating exposure of entire urban populations and gaining an understanding of the sources of exposure. Summary includes a listing of TEAM study published articles and reports. U.S. EPA, Office of Acid Deposition, Environmental Monitoring and Quality Assurance, Office of Research and Development, EPA Document Number 600/S6-87/002, September 1987.

Project Summary: Indoor Air Quality in Public Buildings: Volume I Summarizes a study of VOCs present in new and existing buildings. The researchers identified 500 VOCs in indoor air in four buildings (a school, two homes for the elderly, and an office building) and determined that concentrations of certain target VOCs are elevated in buildings due to emissions from certain building materials (measurements were taken from 16 such materials). Concentrations of compounds such as xylene and decane were elevated in the new building at completion of construction but fell off markedly within six months. Study was limited in scope and duration, made no extrapolations or estimates of VOC distribution frequency in public buildings, and recommended further study involving different types of buildings and many more types of building materials. A copy of the study report may be obtained from the National Technical Information Service in Springfield, Virginia. U.S. EPA, EPA Document Number 600/S6-88/009a, September 1988.

Project Summary: Indoor Air Quality in Public Buildings: Volume II Summarizes results of companion study to that reported by Volume I. Six buildings were sampled for VOCs (a hospital, two homes for the elderly, two office buildings, and an institute for governmental studies). The new buildings had high concentrations of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons immediately after completion but concentrations declined by an order of magnitude within several months. Building materials emitting these chemicals at the highest rates were surface coatings such as adhesives, caulking, and paints; wall and floor coverings such as molding, linoleum tile, and carpeting; and miscellaneous other materials such as vinyl telephone cables. Researchers surmised that renovation or refurbishment of buildings would also result in temporarily higher concentrations of these chemicals. A copy of the study report may be obtained from the National Technical Information Service in Springfield, Virginia. U.S. EPA, EPA Document Number 600/S6-88/009b, September 1988.

Project Summary: Compendium of Methods for the Determination of Air Pollutants in Indoor Air Summarizes research project which developed a Compendium of Methods for the Determination of Air Pollutants in Indoor Air. The Compendium provides regional, state, and local environmental regulatory agencies with standardized, step-by-step sampling and laboratory analysis procedures for the determination of selected pollutants in indoor air. A core set of ten chapters, with each chapter containing one or more methods, covers VOCs, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, air exchange rate, benzo(a)pyrene and other polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and several other contaminants. A copy of the full document may be obtained from the National Technical Information Service in Springfield, Virginia, May 1990.

Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools Action Kit (Most of the "Kit" is available in HTML via the links below) This easy-to-use kit shows schools how to carry out a practical plan of action that will maintain or improve indoor air quality at little or no cost using common-sense activities and in-house staff. The kit was developed by EPA, and is co-sponsored by the National Education Association, National PTA, Council for American Private Education, Association for School Business Officials, American Federation of Teachers, and the American Lung Association. The order form for the kit is available from IAQ INFO via EPA Document Reference Number 402-K-95-001, September 1995.

The Action Kit (Stock #055-000-00503-6) is available for $22 from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO), P.O. Box 371954, Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954. Call (202) 512-1800, fax (202) 512-2250. IAQ Problem Solving Wheel (Stock #055-000-00504-4) are also available separately, $11 per package of 10. 25% discount for orders of 100 or more.

The IAQ Tools for Schools -- Taking Action and Ventilation Basics Videos are available free of charge and can be obtained by calling the IAQ INFO Clearinghouse at 1-800-438-4318.

The following components are contained in a folder with a Velcro flap [Notice that most of the elements of the kit are available on this web site]:

bulletIAQ Coordinator's Guide (88 pages)
bulletIAQ Coordinator's Forms (5 forms, 10 pages total) [iaqforms.zip is a 353K zipped file of the 5 PDF files that follow]
- Activating the IAQ Management Plan (2 pages) - iaqmgmt.pdf (160K)
- IAQ Coordinator's Checklist (2 pages) - iaqcoord.PDF (174K)
- Checklist Log (1 page) - chklst5.PDF (93K)
- Local IAQ Service Providers List (1 page) - service.PDF (82K)
- Problem Solving Checklist (4 pages) - problem.PDF (384K)
Click here for the unzip utility || Download the Adobe Acrobat Readerdownload Adobe Acrobat Reader
bulletIAQ Backgrounder (6 pages)
bulletIAQ Checklists (8 checklists, 38 pages total) Call or EHSOemail us if you are interested!
Teacher's Checklist, Administrative Staff Checklist, Health Officer's Checklist, Ventilation Checklist, Building Maintenance Checklist, Food Service Checklist, Waste Management Checklist, and Renovation and Repair Checklist
bulletIAQ Problem Solving Wheel

Building Air Quality: A Guide for Building Owners and Facility Managers The Building Air Quality, developed by the EPA and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, provides practical suggestions on preventing, identifying, and resolving indoor air quality (IAQ) problems in public and commercial buildings. This guidance provides information on factors affecting indoor air quality; describes how to develop an IAQ profile of building conditions and create an IAQ management plan; describes investigative strategies to identify causes of IAQ problems; and provides criteria for assessing alternative mitigation strategies, determining whether a problem has been resolved, and deciding whether to consult outside technical specialists. Other topics included in the guide are key problem causing factors; air quality sampling; heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems; moisture problems; and additional sources of information. The order form is available from IAQ INFO via EPA Document Reference Number 402-F-91-102, December 1991.

The text of Building Air Quality is available here as a series of PDF files which you can download and view or print. You can go to the table of contents and select just the form or section that you need to download and view/print, or you can download the entire PDF version of the guide as a ZIPPED file to view/print. You will need the Adobe Acrobat Reader to view these files and you will need a utility to unzip the file, both are provided here.

Go to the Building Air Quality Table of Contents and select the specific PDF file that you require.

Download the Zip File of the entire Building Air Quality PDFs.


To obtain the loose-leaf-format version of the Building Air Quality, complete with appendices, an index, and a full set of useful forms, GPO Stock # 055-000-00602-4, for $28, contact the: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO), P.O. Box 371954, Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954, or call (202) 512-1800, fax (202) 512-2250.

Information on how to order the "Building Air Quality Training Kit" with instructor materials and handouts to conduct a 4-hour companion course ($150.00) to Building Air Quality: A Guide for Building Owners and Facility Managers, listed above is available through the IAQ INFO Clearinghouse.

Information on how to order the "Orientation to Indoor Air Quality" instructor and student materials used to conduct a 21/2 day training course ($180.00) is available through the IAQ INFO Clearinghouse.

Building Air Quality Action Plan The Building Air Quality Action Plan (BAQ Action Plan) meets the needs of building owners and managers who want an easy-to-understand path for taking their building from current conditions and practices to the successful institutionalization of good IAQ management practices. It emphasizes changing how you operate and maintain your building, not increasing the amount of work or cost of maintaining your building. The BAQ Action Plan follows 8 logical steps and includes a 100-item Checklist that is designed to help verify implementation of the Action Plan.

In order to use the Building Air Quality Action Plan effectively, one must have a thorough understanding of the concepts and practice of managing indoor air quality, an understanding that can be gained from a thorough reading of Building Air Quality: A Guide for Building Owners and Facility Managers (BAQ). In addition, there is extensive internal referencing of this BAQ Action Plan to the original BAQ guide, making it helpful and easy to use both documents together. EPA Document Reference Number 402-K-98-001, 1998.

Introduction to Indoor Air Quality: A Self-Paced Learning Module The Indoor Air Quality Learning Module and its companion document, the Indoor Air Quality Reference Manual, provide an introduction to indoor air quality for environmental health professionals. Primary focus is on residential indoor air quality. Documents cover those aspects of indoor air quality important for establishing an indoor air quality program by a state or local government agency. Developed under a cooperative arrangement between the National Environmental Health Association, the Bureau of Health Professions of the U.S. Public Health Service, and the Indoor Air Division of the EPA. EPA Document Reference Number 400-39-1002, July 1991.

Introduction to Indoor Air Quality: A Reference Manual The Indoor Air Quality Reference Manual is the companion document to the Indoor Air Quality Learning Module. The Reference Manual provides an opportunity for continuing education plus useful reference material on selected indoor air quality topics. Divided into eight sections corresponding to the first eight lessons of the Learning Module, the Reference Manual also contains information and exhibits which can be used in field investigations (e.g., problem diagnosis, sample measurement, data collection forms, and a listing of public health and occupational standards). Developed under a cooperative arrangement between the National Environmental Health Association, the Bureau of Health Professions of the U.S. Public Health Service, and the Indoor Air Division of the EPA, July 1991.

bullet"The U.S. EPA/ORD Large Buildings Study," Results of the Initial Survey of Randomly selected GSA Buildings, Fortmann, Clayton, Highsmith and Nelson, 1994.

bulletS.E. Womble, R. Axelrad, J.R. Girman, R. Thompson, and V.R. Highsmith, "EPA BASE Program - Collecting Baseline Information on Indoor Air Quality," Proceedings of Indoor Air '93, Vol. 1, pp. 821-825.

bulletS.E. Womble, J.R. Girman, E.L. Ronca, R. Axelrad, H.S. Brightman, and J.F. McCarthy "Developing Baseline Information on Buildings and Indoor Air Quality (BASE '94): Part I - Study Design, Building Selection, and Building Descriptions. Proceedings of Healthy Buildings '95, Milan, Italy, Vol. 3, pp. 1305-1310.

bulletJ.R. Girman, S.E. Womble, and E.L. Ronca, "Developing Baseline Information on Buildings and Indoor Air Quality (BASE '94): Part II - Environmental Pollutant Measurements and Occupant Perceptions," Proceedings of Healthy Buildings '95, Milan, Italy, Vol. 3, pp. 1311-1316.

bulletS.E. Womble, E.L. Ronca, J.R. Girman, and H.S. Brightman, Developing Baseline Information on Buildings and Indoor Air Quality (BASE '95)," ASHRAE IAQ '96, Path to Better Building Environments.

bulletH.S. Brightman, S.E. Womble, E.L. Ronca, and J.R. Girman, '95 Baseline Information on Indoor Air Quality in Large Buildings (BASE '95). Proceedings of Indoor Air '96, The 7th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate, Vol 3, pp. 1033-1038.   This paper presents selected data from 16 BASE buildings studied during 1995. It provides a summary of building descriptions including information about building age; size; heating, air-conditioning and ventilation (HVAC) system type; occupant number; and smoking policy. This paper also summarizes environmental pollutant measurements, and occupant perceptions of indoor air quality in the 16 BASE buildings.

This page was updated on 30-Mar-2016

 

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Environmental and safety services for business - training, consulting, assessments, ISO14000, report and permit preparations and expert testimony. http://www.ehso.com/EHSservices/enviserv.htm
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Environmental and safety services for business - training, consulting, assessments, ISO14000, report and permit preparations and expert testimony. http://www.ehso.com/EHSservices/enviserv.htm
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